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APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY: Change at the Speed of Imagination, SECOND EDITION by Ralph Kelly, Bernard Mohr, Jane Magruder Watkins

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Provocative Propositions

We like the adjective “provocative” because a key criterion for these statements is that they elicit an “oh, wow” response from a reader rather than a “ho-hum” response, that is, they stretch, challenge, or interrupt the status quo. In some situations and in some cultures the term “provocative proposition” may not serve well. It is too “provocative” as a title. In those cases, the term “possibility statement” serves well.

David Cooperrider, in an e-mail to the AI listserv, offers the following thoughts on provocative propositions and how that guides the redesign of the organization:

On designing the ideal organization: What is becoming increasingly clear to me is that if people do great work with [the processes of inquiry ...

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